People with developmental disabilities can not take any more cuts, front-line workers warn 

Developmental Services workers, represented by the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), held a press conference at Queen’s Park to mark International Day of Persons with Disabilities and the tenth anniversary of Ontario’s transition from institution-based developmental services to a community living model. They warned the Ford government that chronic underfunding and cuts to services are leaving people with developmental disabilities isolated from their communities… Click on link below for full article

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/people-with-developmental-disabilities-can-not-take-any-more-cuts-front-line-workers-warn-ford-government-859389008.html

2019 FALL WORKSHOPS

PASSPORT INFORMATION SESSIONS

Brampton Sessions: 456 Vodden St.E. Unit #3, Brampton, ON L6S 5Y7                                     

Date: Tuesday, September 17, 2019   Time: 1:00 – 4:00pm                                                 

Date: Tuesday, October 8, 2019         Time: 1:00 – 4:00pm                                                              

Caledon Sessions: 12 Parr Blvd. Unit #10, Bolton, ON L7E 4H1

Date: Thursday, September 19, 2019    Time: 1:00-4:00pm

To register for these sessions, contact Saara Zainul, Peel Passport Developer at 905-866-6300 ext.225

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GUARDIANSHIP

Lisa Sticht-Maksymec, a lawyer with Pallett Valo, will present information about legal guardianship for adults living with a developmental disability.

Date: Thursday, September 19, 2019                         Time: 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Location: 19 Rutherford Rd S, Unit B, Brampton L6W 3J3 (behind Napa Auto Parts)

To register: email [email protected] or call Karen 905-453-8841 ext.1221

INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLAN (IEP)

Robert Lattanzio from ARCH Disability Law Centre will discuss the Individual Education Plan (IEP) and expand on the rights and responsibilities of the parent/guardian in developing an IEP.

Date: Tuesday, October 8, 2019                                 Time: 7:00-8:30 pm

Location: 19 Rutherford Rd S, Unit B, Brampton L6W 3J3 (Behind the Napa Auto Parts)

To register: email [email protected] or call Karen 905-453-8841 ext.1221

PASSPORT INFORMATION SESSION

Passport Community Developer, Saara Zainul, will present information about Passport funding and how to utilize these funds to support their loved ones with a developmental disability.

Date: Tuesday, October 29, 2019                               Time: 7:00-8:00pm

Location: 19 Rutherford Rd.S. Unit B, Brampton L6W 3J3 (behind Napa Auto Parts)

To register: email [email protected] or call Karen 905-453-8841 ext.1221

WILLS & TRUSTS

Lisa Sticht-Maksymec, a lawyer with Pallett Valo, will present information regarding Wills, Henson Trusts & RDSP’s for their loved ones with a developmental disability.

Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019                         Time: 7:00 – 8:30pm                         

Location: 19 Rutherford Rd.S. Unit B, Brampton L6W 3J3 (behind Napa Auto Parts)

To register: email [email protected] or call Karen 905-453-8841 ext.1221

HOUSING TASK FORCE’S FINAL REPORT STATES WE HAVE A SUPPORTIVE HOUSING CRISIS

There is a housing crisis confronting Ontarians with developmental disabilities —
and it is a crisis that has been growing steadily more serious for at least twenty years.
For many citizens whose families are unaffected by the challenges connected with
developmental disabilities, the housing crisis is often invisible. Too often, however,
housing challenges can bring pain and consequences that profoundly limit the joys
and opportunities that should be available to all in a province as blessed as ours.

 Click on Read Report

Province promises improvements to autism services in Mississauga and Brampton

The provincial government’s announcement that it will create a needs-based autism plan for families in Ontario is receiving mixed reviews.

“I’m very encouraged, but I’m also cautious,” said Tara Bourgeois, of Brampton, who is the mother of an 8-year-old boy who has autism. “We’re getting a lot of talk but no action.”

After six months of protests from families over cuts to autism services, Children, Community and Social Services Minister Todd Smith announced Tuesday (July 29) the province will continue to provide continuity of service while the ministry works on a new program for autism services.

The province said it will invest an additional $278 million in Ontario’s autism program, bringing the total amount to $600 million each year.

Come January, Brampton single-father of autistic boy will have to pay over $55,000 out of his pocket to cover critical treatment.

‘Significantly impacted’: Nearly 300 ErinoakKids employees receive layoff notices due to autism funding overhaul

“Ensuring the Ontario Autism Program is needs-based will help families that require specialized care for their children,” Mississauga Centre MPP Natalia Kusendova said in a statement. “We must work together to protect the sustainability of the program so that it can support children and families today and in the future.”

However, the new program will not be in place until April 2020.

“Some of these people have been waiting two to four years,” said Bourgeois. “Many families, unfortunately, will likely be unhappy as they continue to wait for therapy. I feel their agony as I’ve been on a wait list before.”

This is an unreasonably slow time frame, according to the Ontario Autism Coalition (OAC). In the meantime, the OAC said parents are being told childhood budget cheques will continue to be issued to families on the wait-list, even though there is agreement a one-size-fits-all approach is wrong.

“It’s tidy in terms of administration,” said Bruce McIntosh, past-president of OAC. “It’s based on the province’s needs and not families.”

Although the province says there are now 25,000 families on the waiting list for services, McIntosh said there is no way to determine exactly how many families are waiting because of privacy laws.

McIntosh said some families have registered their child in different regions to expedite access to services. He’s heard of some parents who have joint custody of a child registering the child twice.

Bourgeois is fortunate her son will get an additional six months of therapy. But what happens to parents of children who have other disabilities, such as Down syndrome, asked Bourgeois? “They are left in the dust.”

In August, OAC will hold another round of protests outside MPPs’ offices. McIntosh said the message is “hurry the hell up” and get the program up and running.